Keeping a Millennial Milestone Cheap (Moving, Part I)

If you were to walk in the front door of my apartment right now you’d probably turn to me in shock and scream, “You’ve been robbed!” To which I would smile and shake my head whilst trying to figure out how to explain my minimalist approach to decorating an apartment I’ve lived in for two years.

Mostly, lack of finances contribute to my apartment’s aesthetic. Moving to, and living in, New York City takes quite a toll on the bank account, so I’ve  selected to only have the bare essentials. However, an even stronger influence on my design choices are my mother’s moving philosophies.  That, or I  identified with Cindy Lou Who in my youth and secretly hoped my grownup apartment would look like the Grinch had ransacked my home on Christmas Eve.

how-the-grinch-stole-christmas-1966-cindy-loo-who(I truly rocked pigtails and onesies in my youth.)

Mama’s First Philosophy:  Until you’re ready to settle down, everything you own should be able to fit in the back of a car.

That piece of maternal advice came my way on the eve of my move to New York. I stood in my parent’s basement as I attempted to sort all my worldly possessions into two piles, “Take to New York” and “Leave behind.” In my mother’s defense, I only had the room of a Honda CR-V to get all my belongings to the Big Apple so the advice was probably more practical in nature than a lifelong motto. Regardless, it has stuck.

HPIM5968(I wish I could move with only two duffel bags.)

My mother’s philosophy aside, growing up as an expat contributed to my minimalist lifestyle. When you grow up prepared to move every few years you learn to cut out the extra weight (or your parents force you to get rid of your excessive stuffed animal collection because 15 is a little old to be so attached to teddy bears).

Mama’s Second Philosophy: Focus on decorating one room at a time and buy quality furniture that will last you a long time.

She’s right. I don’t have any witty words about it. Wait, I do. This sage advice has a powerful nemesis, Ikea.

My Philosophy: Don’t waste your money buying boxes and bubble wrap.

Do not, I repeat, DO NOT buy boxes or bubble wrap from a FedEx, UPS, Staples or Home Depot stores. If you’re packing up your own belongings then ask the proprietors at your local grocery or liquor for their leftover boxes. Typically, they are more than happy to hand them over.

If that doesn’t work out for you then cook a nice dinner for your friends that work in an office. After a bottle of wine, politely request they pilfer the the recycling piles at work for boxes and newspapers. If you’re staying in the area and just moving apartments/houses try asking all your buddies to loan you duffle bags or suitcases.

HPIM8430Moving incurs significant expenses so it’s important to try and pinch some pennies where you can, especially if you’re a millennial without a relocation benefits package.

For daily bits of wit and financial advice follow the journey on Twitter @BrokeMillennial. Go the main page and subscribe if you’d like to receive once-a-week email updates about new posts!

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Surviving on a 20-pound Bag of Rice Due to Budget Cuts

For daily bits of wit and financial advice follow the journey on Twitter @BrokeMillennial.

So here I was, in New York City at 22-years-old barely making enough money to keep a roof over my head and put food in my mouth. Luckily, I can be a pretty resourceful person, please remember the hoarding of hotel toiletries, and found ways to feed myself for little to no money.

Many of my formative years were spent in Asia which influenced a lot about me, including dietary habits. A bowl of Japanese sticky white rice is my soul food so I came to New York armed with a rice cooker, pillaged from my parent’s basement of course.

IMG_3112(Still my pride and joy.)

Fortunately, the local grocery store (Trade Fair) catered to the diverse neighborhood I found myself living in. For those who haven’t been in a New York City grocery store, it’s quite an experience. Aisles are barely wide enough to fit a small grocery cart and two standard size humans can barely fit side-by-side, it’s almost enough to make you run screaming for the suburbs. For those of us who dislike being touched, particularly by strangers, it’s a nightmare.

Packed subway(Subways are also a treat. Clearly he agrees.)
Photo credit to Jessie Jay

Bracing myself, I entered the store and after anxiously hunting, finally found my holy grail: a bag of rice. She was a beauty, all 20 pounds of her. The $12 price tag threw me for a loop because I had only budgeted for $30 of grocery spending money. The idea of spending nearly half my budget on just rice caused me to break out in the kind of cold sweat only a financial problem can induce. After several minutes of mentally debating the purchase, and majorly clogging up the aisle for all other standard sized humans, I threw the sack over my shoulder and headed for checkout.

Army(Trade Fair is still my Vietnam.)

It was an excellent purchase that I proceeded to survive off of for many months while my finances continued to take a beating.

IMG_3110(There she is.)

In addition to eating copious amounts of rice (don’t worry I usually added eggs or veggies) I also became something of a scavenger. As a babysitter, cupboards of children’s snacks were at my disposal, even if they were mostly the organic cardboard tasting kind of snacks that Manhattan parents are partial to.

In page life we were fed pizza on Thursdays during double-show tapings. There were usually leftovers and, after the first week, I wised up and started bringing zip-loc bags with me.

Cold Pizza(I wish I could say it looked more appetizing than this.)

The real haul came from my barista job. Not only I would get free beverages at work, but I could also take home “expired” food when I closed up shop. Needless to say, I enjoyed closing. Sure it was mostly scones, microwaveable breakfast wraps and the occasional bistro box, but free food just tastes so good. With all three of my jobs being of the moving-around variety I didn’t have to worry about packing on the pounds from cake-pops and pumpkin loafs.

Starbucks-NYC-Other-Food(Yes, I have sampled all the above products.)

My rice and scavenging days taught me a lot about how to budget money and gave me an appreciation for a meal with decent nutritional value.

The term budget causes some people undue stress. For me, it’s empowering. It’s important to understand how much money you earn after expenses and then figure out where to allocate your remaining funds.

For many millennials, standard expenses include rent, utilities, cell phone bill, transportation, food and student loans. In New York my expenses averaged out to$1,174 a month, before food. Even though food is obviously an important category it was where I could scrimp because I scavenged elsewhere.

Some financial experts recommend writing down every penny you spend throughout the day to keep track of your spending habits and learn where cuts can be made. It’s great advice but often disregarded after a day or so. Others recommend just understanding your financial parameters and living within them so you can begin to save and invest.

Money Journal 2

(Be sure to include the price of your new notebooks and pens.)

I’m partial to the latter, live within your means. If you earn $2,000 a month then don’t spend more than $2,000 a month, including all your expenses. Sounds simple, but if you aren’t paying attention to your finances all those dinners out, Starbucks coffees and drinks at the bar add up, fast.

Bonus: My favorite recent blog post about budgeting can be found here (Budgeting: the no budget approach) from Reach Financial Independence.