Brown-bagging It Since ’94

Kids in elementary school cafeterias all over the world are immediately divided into two groups: lunch buyers and lunch bringers. I was a lunch bringer and boy did I rock those homemade lunches. No Lunchables or processed snacks for this girl. It also took me an embarrassingly long time to realize that a reusable cold compress is for sports injuries and not specifically made to keep your lunch cold.
cold_compressEven when I eyeballed the kids with Lunchables and candy bars I knew my lunches were certainly made with love. My mom even would dye my food and milk on holidays: pink for Valentine’s Day and green for St. Patrick’s Day.

make-green-beer

(Years later I would find this reminiscent of my childhood lunches. Yay for being Irish.)

Buying school lunch was a treat in my house. At the start of each month the administration at my parochial school sent home the cafeteria menu. My sister and I would get to pick two days a month to buy lunch (hello pizza Friday).

Feb_Lunch_Menu000113(The real, current lunch menu from my elementary Catholic school. I see they’ve done away with pizza Fridays.)

It’s been 18 years since I first took lunch to school but the mentality still sticks. Except, now I am the one making my lunches and missing the days of green milk.

The Case for Packing Your Own Lunch (with math):

Healthy homemade lunches keep a waistline slim and a wallet fat. By my calculations, I spend approximately $50 a week on groceries for meals (breakfast, lunch and dinner) equating to $200 a month.

If I bought a $7 lunch each workday that would cost $140 a month, nearly three-quarters of my overall grocery money. Granted, my monthly grocery bill would be slightly reduced if I consistently bought lunch during work.

Hypothetically let’s say buying lunch reduced my grocery bill by $10 a week. That’s still $160 per month on groceries. $160 + the $140 lunch bill = $300. That is $100 more a month than I spend buying groceries to make all my meals. On a larger scale, buying lunch could cost me $1,200 a year.

Brown-bagging it aside, there are few small tricks I use to help save money each month.

#BrokeMillennial’s (current) Money Saving Tips:

  • If you’re unwilling to drink water from the tap then invest in a Britta filter over bottled water. The Britta filter has a larger upfront fee but it’s cheaper in the long run.
  • Reuse ziploc bags (big ones and sandwich ones). Wash those sandwich baggies, dry them and save a couple bucks when you pack your lunch.
  • Make your own coffee/tea in the morning.
  • Buy machine washable clothing to avoid dry cleaning bills (or buy Febreze).
  • Like reading or renting DVDs? Get a library card.
  • Unplug electrical appliances that aren’t in use.
  • Never be above hand-me-downs (well maybe one day?)
  • Buy a slow cooker and make big meals for the week.
  • Cut cable.

When doing those just think, “it’s nice when my wallet looks like this at the end of the week.”

IMG_3117(Or with 20s, 50s or a crisp Benjamin)

For daily bits of wit and financial advice follow the journey on Twitter @BrokeMillennial.